Summer Solstice Sabbat

The Summer Solstice (Midsummer) Sabbat represents a time when the masculine forces of nature is at the strongest and most triumphant of the year – just as the hot Summer sun – since it is the longest day of the year.  There are many customs that witches take part in to celebrate this time of the year.

The altar at the Summer Solstice (Midsummer) Sabbat holding the instruments of the art. Book of Lights to the lower left hand of the altar, items representing the four elements, red roses and a chalice of wine and the graal that held the bread. White and Black Candles flank the altar - representing the twin pillars.
The altar at the Summer Solstice (Midsummer) Sabbat holding the instruments of the art. Book of Lights to the lower left hand of the altar, items representing the four elements, red roses and a chalice of wine and the graal that held the bread. White and Black Candles flank the altar – representing the twin pillars.

This is a Celestial Sabbat where we celebrate the Power and Strength of this time of the year and many will typically perform a ritual act known as “Drawing Down the Sun.”  This is a ceremonial lighting of the Sabbat baalfire with the rays of the sun itself outdoors.  Even if the Sabbat is performed indoors, we will use the sun’s rays to light a taper candle and carry it indoors to light the candles, etc.

Another particular custom is of picking the holy herb known as St. John’s Wort.  This herb is a protective herb that can be placed over the door to protect the household or even used as a fertility blessing charm and placed under the pillows of a couple who wishes to conceive a child.

The path of the sun – deosil, is trod for the purpose of banishing impurity, malignity and hostility and filling ourselves with energies corresponding to the celebration of life and of connecting with our higher emotions.

Because the ceremony itself is very God-oriented, it typically will have more of a ceremonial nature to it and a color scheme of red and white.

A ceremonial dance may also be performed known as the “March of Steel” that is a march-type of dance, emphasizing the power and strength of the God.

We also will typically present written petitions to the gods as well at a separate table that is typically called the “Credence table.”  These paper petitions are carefully written out by all coveners before the Sabbat ceremonial has begun and carefully laid out.  The candles are then carved, anointed and blessed by the coven and are burned with the brazier.  The light, heat and warmth are believed to carry these seed-thoughts on a journey to the gods.

The Credence Table - set up with carved and anointed 7 day candles in which the written petitions were burned and the words carried through the air by the heat, flame and smoke.
The Credence Table – set up with carved and anointed 7 day candles in which the written petitions were burned and the words carried through the air by the heat, flame and smoke.

However you celebrate this time of year, we hope that your celebrations are joyous, merry and fun.  After all, the Sabbat is a celebration of life – so have fun with it too!

Blessed Be!

*If you wish to learn how to conduct a Midsummer Sabbat ritual, we recommend you read the book, “The Sacred Pentagraph” for further details and instructions.

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